My Mishmash of Things This Weekend

Life continues as some say.  I worked on Saturday and pretty much caught up on my sleep due to the lack of it this week.  I managed to visit Amoeba and bought a few movies.  I went to another store and bought more puzzles I don’t need.  I keep being mesmerized by how quickly this year is flying by.  I’m transitioning on moving so that’s taken up a lot of my brain space.  Anyway, here are a few pictures, and promise to blog a little more consistently this month.

amoeba1

amoeba2

amoeba4

drivehome1

doorpuzzle1

hillsnearsepulveda

steinbeckquote

williamstaffordquote

dowdquote

 

Genghis Khan: Part Five

IMG_1759

IMG_1758

IMG_1723

IMG_1705

IMG_1710

IMG_1706

IMG_1707

IMG_1750

IMG_E2002

IMG_2010

IMG_E2003

The Prolific Patriarch

Not only did Genghis Khan conquer much of the world, he may have helped populate it.  Recent genetic studies indicate that at least 16 million men living today are descendants of a Mongolian male who  lived around 1,000 years ago.  That’s one in every 200 males who have identical Y chromosomes, a block of DNA passed on unchanged from father to son through generations.  They all share the same random mutations.  How do we know it started with Genghis Khan?  Actually, the lineage may have started with one of his ancestors.  But genetic testing points to Mongolia as the focus and most of the descendants live in lands conquered by the Mongols.  And, remember that the Great Khan had many wives and concubines as well as first pick of maidens in newly conquered territories.  For the most part, the cultures conquered by Genghis Khan, his sons, and his grandsons favored multiple wives.  With each new generation the number of descendants would have increased exponentially.

IMG_E2020

The Death of Genghis Khan

Genghis Khan enjoyed a long life for his time – 65 years.  He died while supervising his troops in the conquest of the Xixia people of Western China.  He instructed his troops to keep his impending death a secret so as not to embolden his enemies.  But how Genghis died and where he is buried remain mysteries.  According to some legends, he bled to death from an arrow wound in the leg.  In other accounts he died from a fall from his horse.  And the Xixia people preferred a version in which Genghis was killed by the mother of a princess he had stolen for his harem.   Genghis’s burial was made into an elaborate mission according to the Secret history f the Mongols, written shortly after Genghis’s death.  His body was taken to a resting place in Mongolia.  So that his grave would remain hidden, all people and animals along the route were killed, as were the soldiers who accompanied his corpse.  Only a pregnant camel was left at the grave – camels return each year to where they gave birth. By following the camel, his offspring could worship at his grave.  Many expeditions have searched for Genghis’s tomb and hidden treasures within.  The searches have centered on Burkham Khaldun, the forested Mongolian mountain near where he was born.  None have succeeded.   Wherever Genghis is buried, it is quite possible that here is no treasure buried with him.  Genghis disdained personal wealth, dressing plainly, and giving away his belongings.  What Genghis coveted (other than women) was an eternal, peaceful Mongol Empire.

IMG_1766

This is the end of the Genghis Khan photos.  Hope you enjoyed the photographs.

Genghis Khan: Part Four

Clothing, jewelry, instruments, and other items from Genghis Khan’s time.

IMG_E1884

IMG_E1792

Version 2

IMG_E1803

IMG_E1835
Traditional Mongolian Monk’s Clothing made of raw silk from 19th century
IMG_E1753
The shaman wardrobe during Khan’s time.
IMG_E1754
Shaman’s sword during Khan’s time.

IMG_1791

IMG_1790

IMG_1831

IMG_E1824

IMG_1825

IMG_E1829

IMG_1827

IMG_E1813

IMG_E1812

IMG_E1811

Version 2

Version 2

Version 2

Version 2

IMG_E1805

IMG_1886

IMG_E1800

IMG_E1801

IMG_E1802

IMG_E1794

IMG_E1795

IMG_E1797

IMG_E1799

This diorama was hard to see in person and even more difficult to see in photo, but trust me it was impressive.

IMG_1840

IMG_1839

IMG_1721
Pagoda

IMG_1716

IMG_1715

IMG_1714

IMG_1711

IMG_1712

IMG_E1881

Continue to part four of Genghis Khan’s bloodline and death.

cwhite2018

 

 

Genghis Khan: Part Two

Swords and weaponry used during the Khan family reign.

IMG_1880

IMG_1901

IMG_E2017

IMG_E1925

IMG_E1997

IMG_E1998

IMG_E1995

IMG_E1996

IMG_E1971

IMG_E1970

IMG_E1974

IMG_E1975
Marco Polo gave this sword to Genghis Khan as a gift.
IMG_E1920
Sword General’s Halberd

IMG_E1921

IMG_E1896

IMG_E1897

IMG_E1898

IMG_E1927

IMG_E1932

IMG_1929

This triple-bow siege crossbow was huge.  These photos don’t show how massive it was seeing it in person.

IMG_E1939

IMG_E1937

IMG_E1936

Mongolian warriors and the way of life during Khan’s reign.

IMG_E1911

IMG_E1924

IMG_E2008

IMG_E1719

IMG_E1726

IMG_E1727

IMG_E1728

IMG_1731

IMG_1730

Koreans were under Mongol rule from 1250 to 1392, and paid tribute/tax to the Mongols in weapons and armor.   This is one example.

IMG_E1915
Korean tribute helmet made of iron from 1350
IMG_1918
Mongolian helmet made of iron from 1600

horsesmongols

IMG_1899

IMG_1909

IMG_E1905
Stirrups made of iron from 1600
bridle bits
Bridle bits made of iron from 1850 to 1900
IMG_1907
Saddle made of wood and leather from 1800
IMG_1902
Saddle made of wood with ray skin cover from 1580

The whole ensemble of helmet, sword, gun, and arrow.

IMG_E1893

IMG_E1895

IMG_E1890
Chain-mail armor made of iron from 13th to 14th century

IMG_E1888

IMG_E1885

IMG_E1889

IMG_1922

gkquote1

Continue to part three of pottery, carvings, and other small items.

cwhite2018

 

Genghis Khan: Part One

I could not use my flash in the exhibit or take video of the performers.  This is why some of the pictures are semi-blurry and most are darker than normal.

How do you actually pronounce the ruler of Mongolia’s name?

IMG_E1704

Genghis Khan’s empire and influence through the years.

IMG_1694

IMG_1695

IMG_1931

The ruler, himself, as a replica bronze statue.

gkmonument

IMG_1691

Genghis Khan was a warrior and statesman.

IMG_1700

Not everyone thought highly of Genghis Khan including a few of his own people.

IMG_E2014

  Size perspective of Genghis Khan’s empire.

IMG_7168

You better bring your passport if you want to travel.

IMG_1693

IMG_1698

Capital life in Karakorum was the place to be during Khan’s reign.

IMG_E1951

religionkk

img1815a

img1815

IMG_E2021

Buddhism, Shamanism, Islamic, and Christian faiths were found in Mongolia.

IMG_E1858

IMG_E1988

IMG_E1990

shamanismgk

IMG_1966

Genghis Khan and his descendants in wooden sculpture.

Chagadei (second son of Genghis Khan), Khaishi (second son of Ogudei who is Genghis Khan’s son), Wife of Khaishi, and Oruz (oldest son of Kaidu)

IMG_E1945

IMG_E1946

Nazama, Turandot, and Kaidu

IMG_1953

IMG_E1956
Nazama is the wife of Kaidu from the Yuan Dynasty in 1300.
IMG_E1954
Kaidu (Moon King) 5th and Last Khan of Mongol Empire from Yuan Dynasty in 1300.  He lived from 1241 to 1301 AD.
IMG_E1955
Turandot (Moonlight or the All-White Princess) and daughter of Kaidu and Nazama.  She lived from 1260 to 1306 AD.

Enduring elements from Mongolian culture.

IMG_E2029

Quotes from Genghis Khan exhibit.

gkquote1

Concepts and items brought to you by Genghis Khan that exist today.

IMG_E2028

IMG_E2022

IMG_E2025

IMG_E2024

IMG_E2023

Tsam masks and artwork honoring Genghis Khan and Mongolia.

IMG_E1980

IMG_E1979

IMG_E2039

IMG_E2043

IMG_E2045

IMG_E2037

IMG_E2049

IMG_E2047

IMG_E2046

IMG_E2044

IMG_E2042

IMG_E2041

IMG_E2040

IMG_E2036

Genghis Khan 818 years later in 2018.

IMG_E2030

IMG_E2032

Live performances by a Mongolian musician who played the horse head fiddle (I don’t remember his name) who flew in from Mongolia and Zana Gankhuyag (managed to find him on the Internet).  Zana did two different dances. One was a dance focused on happiness and the other was an interpretation of a man taming a wild horse.  They performed three times each day, five days a week.

IMG_E1830

IMG_E1824

IMG_1872

IMG_1876

IMG_1875

IMG_1871

IMG_1878

IMG_1870

Continue to part two of swords and battle.

cwhite2018